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Quaker Oatmeal Cookies

Classic Quaker Oatmeal Cookies are called Vanishing Oatmeal Cookies for a reason. It’s a recipe that has stood the test of time because the result is a perfectly chewy, sweet, and irresistible cookie.

High angle shot of a plate of oatmeal cookies.

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These Quaker Oatmeal Cookies, also called Vanishing Oatmeal Raisin Cookies, are based on the recipe on the canister of oats. It’s the same famous recipe that appeared on Quaker’s packaging in the 1950s.

This recipe is for the basic Quaker Oatmeal Cookies. It’s the recipe that was listed on the Quaker Oats box in the 1950s. You can make it your own by adding all sorts of mix-ins like raisins, chopped pecans or walnuts, chocolate chips, dried cranberries, shredded coconut, or any number of other tasty bits. 

closeup low angle shot of oatmeal cookies on a white plate.

❤️ Why you’ll love these classic oatmeal cookies

  • They’re classic! These are probably the same chewy oatmeal cookies you remember fondly from childhood, whether you called them Quaker Oatmeal Cookies or Vanishing Oatmeal Raisin Cookies! This is the recipe that was on the Quaker Oats canister in the 1950s.
  • They’re easy to make, and quick, too! Just 10 minutes to measure and mix ingredients and 15 minutes to bake.
  • They’re versatile! You can add in all sorts of tasty bits to make your own versions. Of course you can add raisins for traditional Oatmeal Raisin Cookies. Try white chocolate chips and dried cherries, shredded coconut and dried pineapple, or chocolate chips and walnuts.
  • You can make traditional drop cookies or press the dough into a baking pan to make bar cookies.

Ingredients you need

For the complete list of ingredients with quantities and detailed prep and cooking instructions, please see the recipe card that appears at the end of this post.

The ingredients for these traditional Quaker Oatmeal Cookies are all basic pantry staples that you most likely have in your kitchen right now! Here’s what you need to make the oatmeal cookie dough:

  • Vegetable shortening: This old-fashioned ingredient is key to giving these cookies their distinctive texture. But although it’s gotten a bad rap due to the original versions being made with unhealthy trans fats, there are now versions made in a healthier way. Look for “trans fat free” on the label. Modern versions of the this recipe substitute unsalted butter, which works great, too, but will produce a cookie with a slightly different texture.
  • Sugar: Use both brown sugar (light or dark) and granulated sugar for the best texture and flavor. I prefer light golden brown sugar here, but dark brown sugar is also fine.
  • Egg: A large egg binds the ingredients together.
  • Flour: Use all-purpose flour. I love King Arthur Flour’s products.
  • Baking soda: Helps the cookies puff as they bake and keeps them from being too dense.
  • Water: Weird, right? But it’s in the original recipe and I don’t want to mess with success.
  • Vanilla: I always use either pure vanilla extract or vanilla bean paste for the best flavor.
  • Salt: I use kosher salt for most everything since it’s what I have sitting on my countertop, but a fine-grained sea salt is better for baking as the fine grains distribute more evenly throughout the mixture. If you use coarse kosher salt, use twice as much as listed.
  • Oats: You can use either quick oats or old-fashioned rolled oats. You don’t need to use Quaker oats—any brand will be fine!
  • Optional additions: Of course, you can add raisins for Oatmeal Raisin Cookies, or chocolate chips for Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies. Other possible additions include chopped walnuts or pecans; dried cranberries, dried pineapple, or other dried fruit; caramel chips or butterscotch chips; or sweetened shredded coconut.

How do you make them?

For the complete list of ingredients with quantities and detailed prep and cooking instructions, please see the recipe card that appears at the end of this post.

This oatmeal cookie recipe is a cinch to make. They are classic drop cookies using simple ingredients. Here’s how to make them:

  1. Whisk together the dry ingredients in a medium bowl.
  2. In a large bowl or the bowl of a stand mixer, beat together the shortening, brown sugar, and white sugar until the mixture is light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add eggs, water, and vanilla and beat to combine well.
  3. Add the combined flour mixture and beat just until incorporated.
  4. Add oats and any optional mix-ins and mix gently to incorporate.
  5. Using a small cookie scoop, drop dough onto the ungreased cookie sheets, leaving about 1 inch in between.
  6. Bake until the edges are browned and the center is set. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the baking sheets for 5 minutes and then transfer them to a wire rack to cool completely.
Low angle shot of oatmeal cookies on a white plate.

MORE COOKIE RECIPES YOU’LL LOVE

Whether you want just a simple classic cookie for an afternoon snack or are building a holiday cookie platter, I’ve got you covered.

Some of my other favorite cookies are Black Sesame CookiesKolackyGinger Snap CookiesFlourless Chocolate Cookies, and Dulce de Leche Cookies.

Lemon Coconut Macaroons and Rhubarb Cookies are a fun change of pace. Hamentashen and Chocolate Rugelach are perfect for Jewish holidays, but even non-Jews love them 

Or try making air fryer cookies like Air Fryer Peanut Butter Cookies or Air Fryer Hot Cocoa Cookies!

Yield: Makes 36 cookies

Quaker Oatmeal Cookies

Quaker Oatmeal Cookies

Classic Quaker Oatmeal Cookies are called Vanishing Oatmeal Cookies for a reason. It’s a recipe that has stood the test of time because the result is a perfectly chewy, sweet, and irresistible cookie.

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup vegetable shortening
  • 1 cup packed brown sugar
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups quick or old fashioned oats

Optional mix-ins, as desired

  • 1/2 cup chopped nuts, your favorite
  • 1/2 cup raisins
  • ½ cup semisweet chocolate chips

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment paper.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, salt, and baking soda.
  3. In a large mixing bowl, beat together the shortening, brown sugar, and white sugar Until it is light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the,= eggs, water, and vanilla and beat to combine well.
  4. Add the dry ingredients mixture and beat just until incorporated.
  5. Fold in the oats and any optional mix-ins.
  6. Using a small cookie scoop, scoop the cookie dough onto the prepared baking sheets, levaing about 1 inch in between.
  7. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until the edges are browned and the center is set. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the baking sheets for 5 minutes prior to moving to a wire rack to cool completely.

Nutrition Information

Yield

36

Serving Size

1

Amount Per Serving Calories 138Total Fat 7gSaturated Fat 2gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 4gCholesterol 8mgSodium 86mgCarbohydrates 19gFiber 1gSugar 10gProtein 2g

Nutrient values are estimates only. Variations may occur due to product availability and manner of food preparation. Nutrition may vary based on methods of preparation, origin, freshness of ingredients, and other factors.

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By on October 31st, 2022

ABOUT ROBIN DONOVAN

Hi, I’m Robin! I am a full-time food blogger, recipe developer, and cookbook author. I spend my days cooking, writing about, and photographing food.

I’m the author of more than 50 cookbooks, including Ramen for Beginners5 Ingredient Cooking for TwoSushi at HomeThe Baking Cookbook for Teens, and the bestselling Campfire Cuisine.

My food writing has also been featured in major print and online pubications including Cooking Light, Fitness, San Jose Mercury News, San Francisco Chronicle, and others. → More about Robin

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